Obesity Is Rare In Predator Cultures, Dozen

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Statues from the Upper Paleolithic may be associated with climate change for obese women. Obesity is rare in predator cultures. However, dozens of hand-held Venus sculptures, the oldest known art sculptures of known humans, of obese or pregnant women, were identified with European Ice Age hunter-gatherers from 38,000 to 14,000 years ago.

In a new article published in the journal Obesity, a team of researchers from the University of Colorado and the American University of Sharjah states that these statues show more plumpness during times of advance of the glacier and less during the retreat of the glacier, and the statues Women closest to glaciers have the highest obesity.

Venus de Venkand, an 11.1 cm (4.4 in) tall figure of Venus, estimated to have been built around 30,000 BC. C. in the Naturhistorich Museum in Vienna, Austria. Image courtesy of: Bjørn Christian Tørrissen / CC BY-SA 4.0 The first modern humans entered Europe during a warming period about 48,000 years ago.

Known as Aurignacians, they hunted bone-laced spears with reindeer, horses, and giant kites. In summer they dined on berries, fish, nuts and plants. But then, until now, the weather was not stable. As the temperature dropped, the ice sheets advanced and became a mess. During the colder months, the temperature dropped to 10-15 ° C (50-59 ° C).

Some hunter-gatherer gangs were killed, others headed south, some took refuge in the jungles. The great game was over. It was during these desperate times that the statues of Venus appeared. They are between 6 and 16 cm (2.4 to 6.3 inches) long and are made of stone, ivory, horns, or sometimes clay.

They often show realistic characteristics of obesity despite the accepted view that obesity is rare among these people. Most of the sculptures are also bare, or nearly naked, which seems ironic given their proximity to the glaciers. They also focus on the torso and the head is usually faceless with small hands and feet.

Many sculptures occur in or around the child’s birth years, some appear pregnant and others show abdominal obesity or increased fat on the buttocks. Some female figures are on the verge of puberty, and statues of middle-aged women are sometimes known. However, obesity is limited to female figurines, as known male figurines are taller and thinner.

The obese idols are always women, some of whom are pregnant; idols have long been interpreted to represent fertility or beauty; therefore, Venus is commonly adopted for idols. The study’s lead author, Professor Richard Johnson, said: Some of the oldest works of art in the world are mysterious sculptures from the time of European hunters in the Ice Age.

Where you would not expect to see obesity. University of Colorado School of Medicine. We show that these statues are related to times of extreme nutritional stress. Professor Johnson and his colleagues measured the Venus statues from waist to hip and waist to shoulder. They found that those closest to the glaciers were thicker than those located further away.

They believe that statues represent an ideal body type for these difficult life situations. We propose that they articulate the ideals of body size for young women, and especially for those who live near glaciers, said Professor Johnson. We found that body size ratios were highest when glaciers moved.

While obesity was reduced when the climate warmed and glaciers receded. According to the team, obesity became a desired condition. In times of pain, an obese woman can have a better child than a malnourished one who suffers during pregnancy. Therefore, idols can be considered with a spiritual meaning.

A fetish or a magical attraction that can protect a woman during pregnancy, childbirth and lactation. Many statues are worn, indicating that they were passed down from mother to daughter for generations. Women entering puberty or early pregnancy can be given in hopes of providing the desired body mass to ensure a successful delivery.

The increased fat will provide a source of energy for the baby during pregnancy, as well as through much-needed insulation, the authors said. Promoting obesity ensures that the band will advance to another generation under these more uncertain weather conditions.

Researchers present a new theory about the ‘Venus’ sculptures. One of the oldest examples in the world, the statue of Venus, which was built around 30,000 years ago, has intrigued and shocked scientists for nearly two centuries. Now Anschutz Medical Campus, a researcher at the University of Colorado, believes he has enough evidence to solve the mystery behind these curious totems.

Hand-drawn depictions of obese or pregnant women, which appear mainly in art history books, were long viewed as symbols of fertility or beauty. But according to Richard Johnson, MD, lead author of the study, published today in the journal, it is the key to understanding obesity, climate change and diet in statues.

“These are some of the oldest works of art in the world, mysterious sculptures of overweight women from the time of hunter-gatherers in Europe’s Ice Age, where you would not expect to see obesity,” said Johnson, School of the University of Colorado Professor of Medicine specialized in Kidney Disease and Hypertension. “We show that these statues are related to times of extreme nutritional stress.”

The first modern humans entered Europe during a warming period about 48,000 years ago. Known as Aurignacians, they hunted bone-laced spears with reindeer, horses, and giant kites. In summer they dined on berries, fish, nuts and plants. But then, until now, the weather was not stable.

As the temperature dropped, the ice sheets advanced and became a mess. During the colder months, the temperature dropped to 10-15 ° C. Some hunter-gatherer bands were killed, others headed south, some took refuge in the jungles. The great game was over. It was during these desperate times that thick statues appeared.

They were between 6 and 16 cm in length and were made of stone, ivory, horns, or sometimes clay. Some were threaded and used as amulets. Johnson and his co-authors, John Fox (retired) Professor, Anthropology at the American University of Sharjah in the United Arab Emirates, and Associate Professor of Medicine Miguel Lanaspa-García, Ph.D.

The CU School of Medicine measured the statues from waist to hip and waist to shoulder. They found that those closest to the glaciers were thicker than those located further away. They believe that statues represent an ideal body type for these difficult life situations.

“We propose that they express the ideals of the body size of young women and especially those who live near glaciers,” said Johnson, in addition to being a doctor and an anthropologist. “We found that body size ratios were highest when glaciers moved, while obesity was reduced when the climate warmed and glaciers receded.”

According to the researchers, obesity became a desired condition. In times of pain, an obese woman can have a better child than a malnourished one who suffers during pregnancy. Therefore, idols can be assumed with a spiritual meaning – a fetish or a magical attraction, which can protect a woman during pregnancy, childbirth and lactation.

Many statues are worn, indicating that they were passed down from mother to daughter for generations. Women entering puberty or early pregnancy can be given in hopes of providing the desired body mass to ensure a successful delivery. The increased fat will provide a source of energy for the baby during pregnancy, as well as through much-needed insulation, the authors said.

Promoting obesity, Johnson said, ensured that the band would take another generation under these more uncertain weather conditions. Statues have emerged as a conceptual tool for enhancing the fertility of mothers and newborns, Johnson said. Thus, in the aesthetics of art an important work was done to emphasize health and survival to adapt to increasing climatic conditions.

The team’s success in gathering evidence to support its theory came from the application of archaeological data and behavioral models from anthropology to measurement and medical scienceThese kinds of interdisciplinary approaches are gaining momentum in science and are very promising, Johnson said. Our team has other themes of Ice Age art and also migration to their research sites.

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